NSW State Brickworks/Brickpit Ring Walk – Homebush, NSW

In a time when building a house meant plenty of brick, mortar and asbestos as opposed to 100% pure cladding, a housing boom meant it was time to get digging. The State Brickworks at Homebush was established by the NSW Government in 1911 to (publicly) provide for the demand for public housing and (privately) to shatter the stranglehold private owners had on the brickmaking industry, because no one makes money without the NSW Government getting a piece of the action. This greedy plan backfired at the onset of the Great Depression, when demand plummeted and the site started operating at a major loss. Ironically, it was sold to a private firm in 1936, and closed soon after.

State Brickworks, Homebush, 1912. Image courtesy State Library of NSW

Of course, the history of bricks in Sydney reaches back much further than Homebush. Brickfield Hill (near Haymarket) owes its name to its brickmaking past, and the St Peters brickyards are still in plain view – I just haven’t been there yet. The Homebush site was adjacent to the State Abattoirs, presumably to maintain the ambience, but more likely because the ground was rich in necessary brick ingredients. The Homebush Brickworks had also served to replace the troublesome State-run sand lime brickmaking operation at Botany, which had in 1914 fallen victim to a labourer strike, and never recovered.

SMH, 19 Dec 1916

After World War II, during which the site had been used as an ammunitions depot by the Navy, the NSW Government sensed an opportunity to make money, and reopened the Brickpit just in time for the second housing boom. If the first boom was a Newcastle, this one was somewhere between a San Francisco and an Indonesia. Chances are that at some point during your life in Sydney, you’ve stayed in a house built with bricks from Homebush. The site even had its own train station for workers to use, which opened in 1939.

A red rattler passes the State Brickworks, 1982. Image courtesy Graeme Skeet/nswrail.net

It should be mentioned that during the 60s, 70s and 80s, the Brickworks was known by a different name to young hoons and petrolheads looking to blow off some steam on a Friday or Saturday night. ‘Brickies’ was a hot destination for drag racers setting off from the Big Chiefs (Beefy’s) burger joint on Parramatta Road, tearing off up Underwood Road in their Monaros towards Brickies Hill. This circuit can be seen in the 1977 film FJ Holden, which will be a major part of this blog sooner than later. The onset of development put a stop to this, but a subtle, if bizarre, homage to that era has been paid through the naming of certain streets around Hill Road, once the drag strip finish line: Nuvolari Place, named for Italian racing legend Tazio Nuvolari, and Monza Drive, after the endurance race of the same name. Sydney also hosted its first V8 Supercar event at the Olympic Park in 2009, echoing the days of weekend supercar stardom in less developed decades. Residents could still nostalgically enjoy extreme noise pollution and rowdy behaviour, but at least this time it was corporately sponsored.

Saturday night grand prix circuit. Thanks, reader Kenny!

Saturday night grand prix circuit. Thanks, reader Kenny!

From an industrial standpoint, they might as well have been making gold bricks at the ‘works for the next three decades…and then the 80s happened. The boom died down, the money dried up, and the Brickworks, which had for the most part of the 20th century poisoned the surrounding land and Homebush Bay, was clumped in the same basket as the increasingly irrelevant State Abattoirs and the volatile Rhodes industrial area – it had to go, but before it did, the crew of Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome (or perhaps The Conqueror 2, just give it a few years) chose the toxic site as a filming location. In 1988, the Brickworks were closed for good. Like the rest of the State-owned Homebush industrial zone, it was included in plans to reshape the area into the Sydney Olympic Stadium in 1992. The Brickpit was to become the tennis centre.

“Wait’ll they get a load of me.”

And so it would have gone, had not a funny, completely unexpected thing happened. The green and golden bell frog was nearing extinction by 1992. Once abundant in Sydney, numbers had fallen so low that a special breeding program was established at Taronga Zoo in the hope that the frog could be saved. As preliminary work was being done, 300 of the small frogs were discovered living in the quarry. Several times since, colonies of the undeniably appealing frog have turned up at proposed development sites, halting work, ruining plans, and causing PR-illiterate development bigwigs to shit a…well, you know. The frogs are no longer critically endangered, but they still have a long way to go.

As the rest of industrial Homebush was transformed for the Olympics, the Brickpit itself followed suit, undergoing heavy remediation. It’s now an environmental feature of the Olympic Park, and features the wonderful Ring Walk, a walkway suspended above the former Brickworks site complete with a giant pond filled with what can only be described as Smylex. Those frogs must be mighty happy.

Here’s my…

…half-assed…

…attempt…

…at…

…glorious panoramia.

It’s funny…we spent the better part of last century digging this place up and sending it off all over the city for our homes, but the frogs cut out the red tape and came to the place itself, making it their home in less than a decade. We didn’t start building units here until years later. Am I saying a frog could run Mirvac or Lend Lease?

Ribbit.

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8 responses

  1. This entry made me LOL. I’ve done the ring walk and it was a bizarre experience. Why is it there? I’m sure the authorities are rightly proud of themselves for saving the frogs but it’s still a very ugly site that nobody particularly wants to walk around…

  2. Michael, I truely congratulate you on your fasinating insights into historic locations. Its a shame more people don’t realize the history behind some of these incredible places. Keep up the good work.

  3. I worked at the brickworks 82 for a couple of months worse job I have ever had without a doubt, they should have lost the place sooner what a shit hole.
    Thanks for the memories Mick I think!

  4. Thanks for a great read. I really appreciate your historical input here, the internet is full of references to the “Brick Pit” and/or the “Ring Walk”, but a 2 paragraph blurb doesn’t go close to your summary.

    FWIW it will be appearing in my blog – Dan’s Daily Photo – tonight, and I’ll be linking to your blog.

    Again, thanks for your hard work.

  5. […] also like to shout-out the Past/Lives blog, which is packed full of local historical references. Most places on the internet have 2 […]

  6. The Red Rattlers weren’t actually passing the State Brickworks. They were stationary. This was a spur line that went into what is now the Bicentennial Park. It was a dead end and for several years was used to store Red Rattlers that had been taken out of service. These Rattlers eventually suffered an arson attack and in a spectacular blaze one evening, all of them reduced to ash. Someone else has posted photos of the fire on the net.

  7. my grandfather Donald George Burns was the chief engineer at the State Brickworks for many years, in 1976 he got a service medal from the queen for his long service in providing bricks for post war Sydney. it was great to read your post – thank you. Hunter

  8. my dad George Herbert Barring Peck (Barry) was a Navvy Driver at the Pit for many years until time of a Heart Stroke and subsequently given a job as a Cleaner or Gardener, I cant remember which. He was 63 when he died. I know he was well respected. I thought I would mention it in respect to his memory. Thanks.

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