Tempe Tip/Penfolds Wines/Ateco/IKEA – Tempe, NSW

IKEA has caused quite a stir in the suburb of Tempe over the last couple of years. Bordered by the Princes Highway and the appealingly named Swamp Road, Australia’s largest IKEA has replaced an itself-enormous Kennards (formerly Millers) Self Storage site, Tempe tip, and a manufacturing facility run by Ateco Automotive. Can I just say, who even knew Millers Storage had been taken over? I’m sorry if this is common knowledge, but I openly admit to not being up on the goings-on within the self storage industry: apparently Kennards acquired Millers’ distinctive orange storage empire in 2004. Wow. Anyway, part of the site IKEA sits upon today was owned by a widow between 1926 and 1940, when it was acquired by the Perpetual Trustee Company. In 1947, the PTC offloaded the site onto now-defunct British tobacco manufacturer W.D. & H.O. Wills.

SMH, 4 Apr 1953

With 2014’s “Grangegate” claiming the NSW premiership of Barry O’Farrell, what better time to take a closer look at the history of Penfolds Wine Cellars at Tempe?

Penfolds bought the site from Wills in 1953, but it wasn’t until 1959 (a good year, apparently) that the steadily growing company opened its new centre, planned as the most modern of its kind. Forward thinking wasn’t exactly in vogue that year, as in 1970 the site received a major update.

A fatty o'barrel greets motorists and other passers-by, 1975.

The fatty o’barrel greets motorists and other passers-by, 1975.

The large wine barrel out the front of this art-deco building was a familiar sight to passers-by during Penfolds’ time at Tempe, which came to a close in 1994.

Penfolds trucks prepare to deliver several delicious drops to premier locations around NSW, 1975.

Penfolds trucks prepare to deliver several delicious drops to premier locations around NSW, 1975.

The handsome Penfolds administration buildings, no doubt filled with furniture as far from the IKEA template as possible, 1975.

The handsome Penfolds administration buildings, no doubt filled with furniture as far from the IKEA template as possible, 1975.

Ateco Automotive moved in in 1995 and had the good taste to leave the art-deco facade alone, but for a few years prior to 2009 the building sat derelict and abandoned.

Image courtesy, as you can see, Decoworks Pty Ltd

Meanwhile, on another part of IKEA’s huge site, a landfill site known as Tempe Tip was doing its part to pollute the area. Much of the tip’s runoff ended up in Alexandra Canal. The tip was closed as a landfill in 1975 and in 1988, it caught fire. Remediation attempts were made in 2005 to turn Tempe Tip into ‘Tempe Lands’ – a wetland paradise adjacent to an existing golf driving range and duck-filled ponds. But the former tip site was found to be too unstable, and the project was put into the ‘too hard’ basket until IKEA came along – then it was their problem.

And what a problem it was; in 2010, construction of the furniture megastore screeched to a halt when tonnes of asbestos from the tip were discovered on the site. Hundreds of workers were exposed and had to be quarantined. In a surprising move, the NSW Department of Environment and Climate Change investigation found no supporting evidence of related claims that run-off from the site was laced with asbestos, since the existence of such evidence would mean IKEA would pack up and go home, taking their money with them.

Magically, the asbestos problems went away, and IKEA was able to open in 2011, much to the detriment of traffic along the Princes Highway. Especially on weekends, it’s a madhouse (appropriately enough, too, given the history of the neighbouring site…but that’s another story). Above all the chaos stands the art-deco clock tower, which for years bore the Ateco name. IKEA has appropriated the building, returning the clock to working order and affixing the IKEA name beneath it.

IMG_1038

It’s a fitting image, really: in IKEA’s world of 9pm weekday closing times, rushed construction efforts and frenzied seizure of unsuitable land, time is money.

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8 responses

  1. Looking forward to an article about the neighbouring madhouse…

  2. Jason McKerron | Reply

    Good timing Michael! Enjoyed the story!
    2 questions:
    1) Was there a med house near the ikea site?
    2) Was “fatty o’barrel” reference to our Bazza?

    1. 1. There was a madhouse next door, but more on that soon.
      2. I might leave that one to the imagination…

  3. Bronwyn Harris | Reply

    All the tower needs now is a big splash of yellow to complement that Ikea blue sky.

  4. I live around the area and work at the store. I knew about a lot of the previous buildings that had been before IKEA, but had no idea about the asbestos… I can’t help but admit I find this really concerning. Do you think there really was no asbestos? Maybe the issue was fixed? Or maybe they left it and continued?

    Also I think I speak for al of us when I say that we’d all like to hear about the (I think it was womens) mental institution that was there years before!

  5. The site next door has been purchased by Bunnings, so more changes to come to the area!

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